Diving Into Cosmetics: Sorbus Acrylic Cosmetic Makeup and Jewelry Storage Case Display Review

Hello my fellow Beauty Kings and Queens!

Welcome to another entry in my Diving Into Cosmetics series. Today I have a review. If you haven’t gathered from my previous entries, I’ve acquired a lot of makeup-lipstick to be exact-so much so I needed an effective way of storing it all.  Enter Amazon once again to save the day with my first makeup storage case.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product: Sorbus Acrylic Cosmetic Makeup and Jewelry Storage Case Display, Purple (4 Large, 2 Small Drawers)

Manufacturer: Sorbus

Purchased from: Amazon.com; 88% positive reviews

Price: List price is $49.99, but I paid $31.99 with free shipping via Amazon Prime.

Remarks:

After keeping tabs on the price point since January, I finally purchased the product last month.  As I embarked on my search to locate a make up storage item within my budget, my eyes set their sights on Sorbus Acrylic Cosmetic Makeup and Jewelry Storage Case Display.  The things that appealed to me were storage space and the color options-7 to be exact varying a bit in price-available for the product.

Storage wise, this product is excellent. It fits all of my lipstick, lip gloss, lip linear, nail polish, etc. And there’s still room for more items.  I ordered my storage unit in purple with the option of 4 large and 2 small drawers. There’s also an option for 3 large, 4 small drawers which is available in the 7 colors.  The top part of the storage unit fits neatly on top but it can also stand aside on its own.

So far I have no issues with the product, though the negative reviews (3%) have stated that the product may crumble and fall apart due to being damaged. I’ll keep my eye on that for future reference.

Overall the Sorbus Acrylic Cosmetic Makeup and Jewelry Storage Case Display, Purple (4 Large, 2 Small Drawers) meets my expectations and is a good quality product.  4/5  stars

 

Diving Into Cosmetics: The Return

Hey everyone! It’s been a while since I’ve written about my journey into the world of makeup… it’s been three whole years since I last made a Diving Into Cosmetics post…

Well life got in the way and my focus was on other things, but my resolve to learn more about makeup remains and I’ve decided to bring back this feature on my site! As I play catch up you can play along and read my three previous posts below.

All caught up? Good.

Stay tuned for new posts coming soon.  Until then take care.

 

A Guide to Sustainable Fashion

I originally wrote this for Uncanny Pop

Everyday, the environment is a topic that is discussed daily from how our actions can have a negative affect on our planet to what we can do to repair the damage and bring about change. One way that we can do that is by being environmentally conscious towards clothing. It’s important to know how and where the clothes on your back are made and that is what sustainable fashion is all about. Sustainable fashion is part of sustainable design and is where a product-in this case clothing-is created and produced with the consideration to the environmental and social impact it may have throughout its total life span which also includes its “carbon footprint.

Here is a guide of common natural and eco-friendly fabrics and a list of sustainable fashion lines that will help you create a wardrobe that’s not only eco-friendly but also fashionable.

Fabrics

Silk: Made by silk worms there is no chemical-based synthetic processing. The only drawback is that after creating the silk,  the worms are thrown into a vat of boiling water in order for us humans to get the silk fibres.  May vegans won’t wear silk due to this, but there is an alternative: peace silk or vegan silk. Clearly labeled, this silk is made from the worm casings that are gathered after the moths have emerged and flown away. In addition, look for silk that has been dyed naturally and is as local as you can get.

Cashmere: Be luxurious and eco friendly at the same time with this fabric which comes from combing out the under-hairs of Kashmir goats.  The fabric is also long-lasting but beware of cheap cashmere as it may have been treated with chemicals and dye with carcinogenic dyes. The fabric may also be mixture with other types like polyester. Real eco-friendly cashmere clothing is expensive but it’ll last a lifetime. As the saying goes, “you get what you pay for.”

Linen: Real linen is made from flax-a crop that requires very little pest-controlling chemicals. Look for this fabric in natural shades or natural dyes and make sure to purchase linen that’s from an eco-certified clothing or fabric company. Beware the linen blends or those that are cheap and chemically treated.

Alpaca: This fabric is from Alpaca sheep that are raised naturally. That means no hormones or chemical treatments. Since this fabric comes in over 52 naturally occurring colors, there‘s no need for dye! Alpaca also keeps you warmer than wool and is long lasting. The only downside is that the fabric most likely will have been imported.

Soy: This fabric is easy to care for and is made from the byproducts of soil oil processing. This fabric is great for underwear and bras due to its long fibres which make the fabric feel soft and silky.  Make sure that the soy products you buy are certified and try to avoid “soy blend” fabric. This fabric is less eco friendly and is a mixture of soy, polyester and inorganic cotton.

Hemp: This fabric is strong, durable and naturally wrinkle-resistant. Clothes made from hemp also offer the cool hand of linen and the softness of cotton. Requiring no chemicals to grow, hemp is often regarded as the ulitmate eco-friendly fabric.  However, hemp farming is not well regulated. There is no monitoring of where its grown nor what types of  chemicals the plant may have come into contact with it.

Merino: The softest of all wools, comes from merino sheep who are bred not for their meat but for their wool. It‘s extremely soft and lacks the itchiness of other wools, which means you can be warm and comfortable. Merino wool offers temperature regulation, moisture control and anti-microbial properties.

Organic cotton: This type of cotton does not have chemicals or toxins added to it during the farming and manufacturing stages. In fact the farming of organic cotton reduces the mass use of pesticides and chemicals. Organic cotton is also becoming more popular and has been seen in stores such as H&M and the Gap. The cons are that the organic cotton you purchase isn’t also assured to be fair trade. In addition, it could be processed using conventional dyes, or treated with chemicals to keep it from wrinkling when its sent overseas. That is why whenever possible buy this fabric in the shades that its naturally grown in: cream, pale, green, and light brown. Purchase clothes that have been coloured using natural or vegetable-based dyes, and look for credible labels that indicated that the product is certified organic, sustainable, and eco-friendly. One example would be be Eco-Cert.

Tencel aka Lyocell: A new fabric that has wonderful qualities. It‘s made with wood pulp from sustainable tree farms (which makes it biodegradable and recyclable) and created with nanotechnology. There are a variety of clothing made from this fabric and it‘s very comfortable. It has 50% greater moisture absorption than cotton and it has a smooth and soft surface. It’s also wrinkle-free. However not all lycoell fabric comes from sustainable wood so be sure to check the labels. Also try to find fabric that’s been dyed with a low-chemical or vegetable colourant.

Bamboo: It is great for both hot and cool climates-bamboo clothing offers built-in temperature control. It keeps you warm in the winter and cool in the summer. It‘s also a durable fabric that is antibacterial. Unlike synthetic fabrics, bamboo repels order. It‘s also anti-static so the static won‘t stop you! The only downside is that there is a toxic chemical aspect to the manufacturing of the fabric and that’s when the bamboo loses its eco status.

Ingeo: A new fabric requires almost half the energy it takes to make cotton-inorganic and organic. The only downfall is that the fabric is made from fermented plant sugars usually derived from corn. As  we all know, growing corn takes a lot of pesticides, water, and land.

Polyester: The normal version of this fabric is made from petroleum and is way of the map in terms of eco-friendliness. However companies are finding ways to create the fabric out of recycled plastic bottles and recycled polyester fabirc! Until then, the only green polyester is vintage and let’s face it, vintage is always in style.

Now that we’ve talked about the fabrics, here’s a list of eco-friendly fashion brands.

Fashion Brands

Jonano: the clothes are made of certified organic bamboo, hemp, and their popular ecoKashmere blend-at an affordable price. The clothes are made using Fair Labor practices, their fabrics use low-impact dyes, and their packaging and mailings are printed on recycled paper.

Loomstate: isn‘t inexpensive; they‘re reasonably priced. You can find bargains on their clothing by going to websites like Greenloop and Bluefly.com

Levi Strauss: has been in the jean making business for a long time, so who better than them to lead the way in eco-friendly denim. They use organic cotton, recycled zippers, buttons, and natural indigo dye. They also donate to environmental causes on a regular basis. Levi also encourages their customers to treat their clothes in an environmentally responsible manner. In 2010, their clothes began to carry new tags that encouraged people to wash their clothes in cold water and dry them on a line. When the clothes are no longer needed, they donate them to Goodwill. Levi also works on worker rights, HIV/AIDS, Equality, and Community Engagement.

American Apparel: has clothes for the whole family at affordable prices

To see more list of eco-friendly fashion brands, click the links below:

Buzzfeed’s 13 Eco-Friendly Fashion Brands For A Cruelty-Free Closet

Elle: 7 Eco-Friendly Fashion Labels To Know Now

Eco Fashion World

Diving Into Cosmetics: Terminology

Diving into cosmetics

Last time I talked about my cosmetics background-or lack thereof-and experience. I have a lot of questions that need to be answered, most of which are about the words used when talking about makeup. For instance the words ‘matte’, ‘swatch’, ‘satin’ etc., what do these words mean? Today we’ll answer those questions and more as I discuss makeup terminology.

Let’s start with the basics:

Swatch: this is when the product-lipstick, eyeliner, nail polish, etc.-is rubbed onto the skin or finger in order to show the color or texture of the product.

Dupe: a lower product that’s similar or a copy of a higher end product. Both products can also be lower end or high end.

  • Low-end: those that are affordable or can be purchased at the drugstore.
  • High-end: department store or exclusive products.

Collection:  Set of makeup products from a brand that is out for a limited time. Usually associated with a theme or a sponsored event.

Haul:  Large collection of makeup shown at once, which has been bought over time or at an event.

e/s: eye shadow

e/l: eyeliner

l/s: lipstick

l/g: lip gloss

T/M: Tinted Moisturizer

FOTD: Face of the Day

  • A picture collage of eye makeup, blush and lip product used that day.

LOTD: Look of the day

  • A picture collage of the complete look

LE: Limited Edition item

MUA: makeup artist can also stand for MakeupAlley.com

MA: makeup artist

HG: Holy Grail, the must have product.

NIB: product is new in box

BOGO: buy one get one free

DC: discounted item

GWP: Gift with a purchase

Here are some product terms:

Matte: product doesn’t have any shimmer or glitter

Satin:  product is somewhat a matte but has some shimmer

Frosty: product is shiny or has a duo-chrome finish

Metallic: product is shiny like metal but not glittery

Bleed/Bled: a lip product that can leave residue on the outer part of the lip after wear

Fall-out: a powdery eyeshadow that transfers flakes and dust to other parts of the face

Chalky: product is powdery but its low quality and hard to blend

To “foil”:  using an eye shadow with a damp or wet brush in order to create a  more vibrant or pigmented effect.

“Runs”: This is when mascara is transferred under the eye area or down the face. This happens sometimes when a person wearing mascara cries.

To “stipple”: using a duo-fiber stippling brush with a foundation to create an airbrush look

Palette: a set that includes various colors of eye shadows, lip colors, or blushes

Resource: How to Learn Makeup Lingo

 

Finally, here’s a list of makeup brands that I’ve heard of:

Nicka K New York

MAC

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL)

Victoria’s Secret (VS)

Urban Decay (UD)

Covergirl (CG)

NYX

Maybelline

Loreal Paris

Revlon

Avon

Estée Lauder Companies

Max Factor

Mary Kay

Carol’s Daughter

Iman Cosmetics

TYRA (Tyra Banks’ cosmetic line)

 

And that’s all for now! A few weeks back I bought my first lipstick and this week I’m about to go buy a few more. I’ll tell you all about it in another post. Have a great weekend!

P.S.

I just found this resource:

Introduction to Makeup Artistry for the Beauty Professional

Now I’m not going to be a beauty professional, but this looks like it has a lot of topics to cover and will help newbies like myself. I’ll take a look at it this weekend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diving Into Cosmetics: So many questions

Diving into cosmetics

Cosmetics or makeup as it’s also called, I’ve always been curious about it. I enjoy watching fashion shows or videos that show models-ladies and gentlemen-having their faces painted in a creative masterpiece.  It’s a part of our culture and it’s history goes as far back as about 5,0000 years ago.

Though I was curious, I didn’t see the point of makeup.  What was the point of going through the hassle of putting all this stuff on your face only to go through the hassle of taking it off? Why do you put on concealer, blush, and all of that other stuff? Why are crimping your eyes? What exactly does an eyeliner do? I could never see the difference it made.

For the majority of my life I’ve never worn makeup.  I couldn’t afford it and the very few times that I was able to buy cheap makeup didn’t make a lasting impression on me.  There have only been two times in my life where I’ve worn makeup. The first was in middle school, I was in sixth grade and I decide to try on my mom’s makeup and go to school with it on.  Nobody noticed anything different about me and it took me a bit of time to take it all off when I returned home.

The second time was when I was in my twenties (I can’t believe I’m saying that) and my mom and I went to the mall.  One of the stores was having an event and at one of the booths they were doing free make overs.  When I did my makeover, I learned from the makeup artist that I really didn’t need to wear a lot of makeup.

After that, makeup wasn’t even a thought. I just went about my daily life scaring folks with my makeup free face and nobody bothered me. And I never have understood the fascination with seeing a celebrity without their makeup, I mean really what’s the point? Some look the almost the same without it and then others look drastically different, what’s the big deal?

I’ve got so many questions about makeup.

What’s is it about makeup that we put it on almost everyday and some of us sleep with it on?  What is the proper way to apply lipstick, what is it made off, why do people use that crimpy looking thing on their eyes, why do you have to put on layers, how many shades of red are there, why do you have a makeup bag, what is it about makeup that we love it some much?

Well starting this year, I’m going to find the answers to these questions and more.

My curiosity has finally gotten the best of me and this year I decided that I would wear makeup.  I won’t be putting on concealer, blush, or eye shadow, let’s not get crazy here.  I’m starting out with lipstick and nail polish.  I’m on a budget so I won’t be doling out cash to buy a whole bunch of stuff, one thing at a time if you please.  I hope to document my journey of learning more about makeup on here so bear with me as I dive into the world of cosmetics.

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